For many folks, a detox sounds appealing but not entirely practical; you might not want to be completely out of reach of your petsitter, your ailing mother or your kids in their first week of college, for instance.

And it is not a trivial concern to worry about the emails, voicemails, texts, work contacts, and other issues big and small piling up while you unplug, waiting to ambush you when you reconnect. Disconnecting for several days only to be forced to sit at your computer for 16 hours straight when you get back isn’t necessarily a good outcome of disconnecting, and could all but obliterate the beneficial effects of the detox within mere hours.

There might even be some things you really cherish about digital connectivity that could be unfair to characterize as digital addiction. For example, when I am flying, one of my favorite things to do is track the flight plan so I know what I am looking at out the window. Not all airlines offer a flight tracking option in the in-flight entertainment, so I often try to follow along using my phone’s GPS.

To me, this doesn’t feel like I am indulging in digital addiction; it feels more like it did when I was following along with road maps on family trips when I was a kid as our family’s designated navigator. Giving this up isn’t really something I care to do, detox or not; if I could take a huge atlas along, I would do it, but there goes traveling light.

So if a full digital detox is not what you have in mind, there are plenty of ways to unplug while traveling that will offer many of the benefits of a detox without a full digital blackout. Possible approaches might include:

  1. Setting aside a short time each day to check all the stuff you would normally check, but with a time limit
  1. Alternating days on and off of digital access
  1. Putting your phone in “airplane mode” whenever you’re outside your hotel room or for a set amount of time each day

You get the idea. You set the terms of the detox according to what is going to work best -and then don’t cheat

Tripos Travel. Trips worth taking.

Please call us for help plan your next trip or free travel advice. We’re here to make you trips fun and memorable. Call os on +27 21 462 6104 or info@tripostravel.co.za visit us on www.tripostravel.com

Lost Passport

It’s the traveler’s worst nightmare: opening your purse, backpack or money belt to discover that your passport has disappeared. Whether it’s stolen or lost and you may never know what happened to your little blue buddy your response should be the same: Act now! Yes, there’s a small chance that you’ll return to your room and find your passport under the bed. So get back to that hotel and search your room from corner to corner as soon as possible, and then contact your embassy if your passport is gone.

What to Do:

Contact the police and then your local embassy. You’ll have to show up in person at the embassy to apply for an emergency passport to get you back home. An emergency passport is only valid for a limited time, and once you are back in your country, you’ll have to apply for a new passport.

Before you leave home, pack the list of items you will need for getting an emergency passport. If you do not have everything you need, you may need to present an affidavit of identifying witness. This will be filled out by a fellow traveler, who can attest that you are who you say you are.

Missed Flight

It’s unfair, your plane could be hours late, and you get no apology, discount or explanation. But if you are three minutes late, running to the gate just as boarding ends, that’s it – the plan’es not coming back to fetch you.

If you always arrive at the airport three hours before your flight and think that only last-minute Larry’s miss their flights, don’t skip this section as it could happen to you too. Events beyond your control, from problems at the security checkpoint to stormy weather, may mar even the best-planned itinerary.

What to Do:

Has your plane taken off without you? Immediately go to your airline’s desk. It is possible that your airline can get you on the next flight. Whether or not it will charge you will vary depending on which airline is involved and if the missed flight was your fault. If there are no other flights or the next flight is booked, try for the next day, or inquire about any available flights from your carrier’s partner airlines.

If your airline refuses to offer a voucher for another flight, get ready to pay up. Passengers who miss their flights sometimes must pay full price for a new ticket and prices are steep when it’s the day of or the day before your departure. Take this as a warning to always arrive at the airport with plenty of time to spare, especially around the holidays.

If you have missed a connecting flight and your luggage has been checked, it will most likely go on without you, so your suitcase may be en route to the Bahamas while you’re stuck in a chilly airport in Chicago. Go to your airline’s ticket counter and ask if it can locate your bags. The airline may be able to hold your bags until you arrive at your destination. This is just one of many reasons why you should pack a change of clothes in your carry-on when you fly.

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Please call us for help plan your next trip or free travel advice. We’re here to make you trips fun and memorable. Call os on +27 21 462 6104 or info@tripostravel.co.za visit us on www.tripostravel.com

Hydration:

If you think hydration is a concern on a cross-country flight, try tripling or quadrupling your time in the air; you might as well spend 15 hours lying on the desert floor. Which is a good comparison, and you should stock up and behave accordingly. Imagine you are going to a full-day hike. How much water would you bring? Expect to drink about that much on a 16-hour flight. Also consider drinking “electrolyte solution. Maintaining electrolyte balance is important, and that you don’t want to become completely diluted with water, particularly for older folks or people with other medical problems. The combination of dehydration and stasis can really become an issue with blood clots.

Deep vein thrombosis:

DVT, the formation of blood clots in deep veins, is a known (if occasionally overstated) risk on longer flights. According to the National Institutes of Health, the risk of developing DVT increases when flights go longer than four hours. The NIH’s tips include walking up and down the aisles of the plane; moving, flexing and stretching your legs to encourage blood flow, especially in your calves; wearing loose and comfortable clothing; drinking plenty of fluids; and avoiding alcohol. Also, if you’re at increased risk for DVT, your doctor may recommend wearing compression stockings while traveling or taking a blood-thinning medicine before you fly.

The combination of being immobile along with the effects of dehydration increases the risk of DVT on long flights.

Here’s some good advice:

  1. Hydrate well the night before the flight, preferably with electrolyte drinks.
  2. Don’t drink alcohol the night before the flight.
  3. Avoid diuretics such as coffee, soft drinks and even chocolate (all of which contain caffeine).
  4. If you have no issue with ulcers, take a baby aspirin the night before and day of your flight.
  5. Get an aisle seat or exit row so you can get up and walk around whenever possible.

Colds & Flu:

With regards getting colds, the flu, bacteria in recycled air, it is your body’s compromised ability to deal with normal bacteria and viruses that puts you in danger of getting sick after a flight.

Tripos Travel. Trips worth taking.

Please call us for help plan your next trip or free travel advice. We’re here to make you trips fun and memorable. Call os on +27 21 462 6104 or info@tripostravel.co.za visit us on www.tripostravel.com

  1. Upgrade.

When traveling long-haul, you have no better friend on the planet than your frequent flier miles. Call your travel agent to find flights on which I could burn up your frequent flyer miles to upgrade your trip. It may be that your get better legroom, fully reclining chairs, edible meals, entertainment and breathing space. It’s worth a try.

  1. Escape.

You will want to have a rock-solid plan for frittering away several hours of your flight, and I don’t mean working; staring at spreadsheets and writing proposals may burn up hours, but it does not make them vanish. You want these hours to disappear almost without a trace. Think headphones and Hollywood blockbusters. Getting a lot of work done is fine but rarely do you have 15 consecutive hours without a phone or email, so I encourage bringing some work but enjoy some downtime too. You deserve it.

  1. Don’t carry on too much stuff.

While checked baggage fees are inspiring travelers to carry on more and more stuff, on a long-haul flight this could burn you; anything that is under the seat in front of you just means less legroom and a more cramped living space for 15 or 16 hours. Don’t bring so much on that you compete for your own sleeping space.

  1. Bring your go-to gear.

When it comes to surviving flights, I am not a gear guy. I can’t be bothered to lug around neck pillows, eye masks, earplugs, noise-canceling headphones, etc. — except on a long-haul flight. As I note above, your total carry-on haul should be limited, but you may want to consider some of these relatively small survival tools. Your body and brain will thank you for every small comfort you can provide, and the inconvenience of packing and carrying these around is dwarfed by the misery of 15 hours in flight with crying children, pilot announcements, engine noise and a major crick in your neck. So gear up with wisdom.

  1. Board relatively rested.

Don’t count on a long-haul flight as a good place to catch up on sleep, it’s not. As attractive and intuitive as it seems to get on a long-haul flight extremely tired, hoping to sleep the whole way, you are in for a world of hurt if you can’t sleep for any reason. You will be on the plane long enough to catch a few winks even if you are somewhat rested, and my advice is to take it when it comes; if your eyes start to droop, get out the eye covers and earplugs, and go with it. If you throw away a solid two-hour nap on a few extra rounds of Angry Birds, you might well be angry at yourself later.

  1. Secure your stuff.

A long-haul flight gives unscrupulous travelers all the more time to size up the location of your wallet, wait until you fall asleep and make a move on your luggage. Secure your valuables deep inside your bags where it would take a TSA X-ray machine to find them. Consider keeping items like your passport, credit cards and cash in a money belt under your clothes.

  1. Consider a sleep aid.

If you are planning to use sleep aids (including “natural” methods such as melatonin, or drugs such as Ambien), try them before you fly with them. A few years ago a friend gave me an Ambien pill for a red-eye flight from Honolulu to New York City, and the drug acted more like a stimulant than a sleep aid. I was awake the entire flight and felt wretched to boot. These drugs can vary greatly in how they affect individuals, so you will want to try them at home before you rely on them on the plane

  1. Ask about seats at the gate.

Failing the ability to choose great seats before your flight, try again at the gate. If the flight is not full, the gate agent may be able to see an empty row, or put you and a traveling partner in a “window and aisle” configuration that reduces the likelihood of having someone sit in the middle seat, thereby getting you a seat and a half, at least.

Tripos Travel. Trips worth taking.

Please call us for help plan your next trip or free travel advice. We’re here to make you trips fun and memorable. Call os on +27 21 462 6104 or info@tripostravel.co.za visit us on www.tripostravel.com

The Capital of Greece and also the largest city, Athens is also one of the oldest cities in the world. The historical significance of this city goes back to a time warping 3,400 years and the region has been continuously inhabited for the past 7000 years. The city we see today is a highly urbanized town and boasts of its ancient monuments and is visited by millions of visitors each year. The city’s various attractions like historical sites and monuments along with a vibrant culture and a welcoming climate has made it one of the top tourist places.

Formerly known by the name Thira or Thera, Santorini is a chain of islands in the south Aegean Sea. The city was an important town during the spread of civilization during the Bronze Age. The islands are a remnant of the volcanic caldera and the town is built in a unique architectural style that makes it a really amazing site to witness and also keeps the houses cool in summer and warm in winter. The special wines and the cuisine are totally worth enjoying and the relaxed lifestyle of the people will ensure a rejuvenating experience upon your visit.

Ancient Peloponnese holds a significant place in Greece’s history. It is considered as the birthplace of the Greek war of Independence and Greek politics has been dominated by the Peloponnesian people ever since. The Peloponnese was considered the heart of political and social affairs in Greece. The peninsula boasts a rich cultural heritage of monuments and sites. The culinary tradition of the Peloponnese is impressive and delicious.

The third largest of the Ionian Islands, Zakynthos is known for its clubs, bars and the various parties held here. The islands were said to have been inhabited since the Neolithic age and was mentioned in the Greek epics of Iliad and Odyssey. The city has a number of ancient and historical sites that are frequented by a huge number of tourists. The town is famous for its olives, currants, citrus fruits and grapes and most of the dishes are centered on these, used as ingredients. The Navagio Beach is one of the most pristine beaches you can ever witness with its white shores and crystal clear waters.

The island of Rhodes is an ancient town mentioned in Greek Mythology and is a world heritage site. The island is characterized like most towns in Greece with mountains and shorelines. The island has been famous since the creation of the Colossus of Rhodes and the Citadel of Rhodes which is a world heritage site. Rhodes has been a blooming city from ancient times and the subsequent reign of the Romans and the Ottoman empires. The various monuments in the city attract a huge number of tourists every year and the architecture of the whole city is a marvel to behold.

  1. Hands-On Harvest Robertson 10-12 March

The Robertson Wine Valley is proud to host its 9th Hands-on Harvest festival. This down-to-earth Autumn celebration takes place from 10 – 12 March 2017 and offers families a chance to experience the magic of harvest.

This fruity fiesta is bigger and better than ever and is poised to shake up Route 62 during the 2017 harvest season. It boasts a wonderful programme of events that includes the towns of Ashton, Bonnievale, McGregor and Robertson. With more than 20 wineries, estates and other establishments taking part, this food and wine affair spoils visitors for choice with a wide variety of tailor-made activities.

Experience the grape’s journey from vine to barrel to glass by grape picking & stomping, vineyard safaris and blending & tasting experiences. Enjoy riverside lunches, vineyard picnics and food & wine pairings. Adrenaline junkies can get their fix of excitement with a host of adventure activities including skydiving, 4×4 routes, golfing, rock climbing, hiking, mountain biking and river cruises.

  1. Vrede en Lust Harvest Festival – 11 March

One of the oldest working wine farms of the Cape, would like to invite you to bless the harvest and celebrate what the earth has given us in abundance! This 328 year old, family-owned and managed, wine farm with its rich history and romantic atmosphere are known to leave guests with a sense of tranquility and connected to the wheel of life. This festive family day will take place in Vrede en Lust’s beautiful gardens under the farm’s ancient oak trees in front of the historic Manor House.

  1. Stellenbosch Street Soires. 8th and 22 March

Immerse yourself in the inimitable food and wine culture of Stellenbosch when the City of Oaks gets painted red with its ever popular, bi-monthly Street Soirees to entice a hip crowd with its local tastes and tunes. The Stellenbosch Street Soirees take place every second and last week of the month for hip crowds to immerse themselves in the inimitable food and wine culture of this forever young town, with live music adding to a cool and casual vibe. The first pop-up street party will spill onto the bustling Drostdy Street on 16 November, when cars will make way for locals and visitors to sip, savour and share in the enviable lifestyle of the country’s second oldest town. It is a vibrant, after-work street party where strangers become friends over a glass of wine with gourmet snacks by resident eateries and upbeat vibes by talented local musicians. “Stellenbosch has a recipe for living that is hard to resist or come by. With these street parties we offer visitors a taste of our way of life through quality wines, delicious bites and live music. I cannot imagine a better way to spend a balmy summer’s evening, let alone better company to share it with,” shares Elmarie Rabe, Manager of the Stellenbosch Wine Routes.

The communal Stellenbosch Street Soirees are for young and old to let their hair down and hang out with interesting characters and friendly folk in the heart of this quaint town. It goes down from 18h00 to 20h00 and each event features a different selection of cellars and food vendors. R70 gets you a glass to taste as many wines as you wish. Sumptuous street food will be on sale.

  1. Franschhoek ATKV Harvest Festival. 25 March

The ATKV Oesfees at Solms-Delta, Franschhoek, will be celebrating another year’s successful wine harvest on Saturday, 25 March 2017. Join the workers of the valley, along with thousands of other music, food and wine lovers to share in the joy of a diverse cultural event, featuring some of the finest homegrown musicians, as well as some of South Africa’s most popular artists and bands.

The Franschhoek valley has a rich and lively music culture. The local Music van de Caab project, sponsored by Solms-Delta and Boschendal, under the leadership of the brilliant Adriaan Brand of Springbok Nude Girls, seeks to preserve and develop the diverse musical heritage of the rural Cape, including the fostering of local musical talent. The Music van de Caab acts that will be performing at the ATKV Oesfees include the Klein-Handjies Pre-school Choir and the “Kaapse Klopse”-style walking band, Langbroeke; a female choir ensemble Die Soetstemme; the Delta Valley Entertainers and the Lekker Lekker Delta group. Top South African talents who will be sharing the stage include Radio Kalahari Orkes, Manouche, Nick Turner, Riku Lätti, Bacchus Nel, Jackie Lätti, Hannes Coetzee, Die Papier Familie Orkes, Akkedis, Les Javan, Hemelbesem and Yoma, Brain Cloete, Churchil Naudé, Die Wasgoedlyn and Tribal Echo. A special treat this year will be a performance by the African Jazz Pioneers. An annual ATKV Oesfees highlight is a performance by winners of the ATKV Riel Dance Final. The Betjies from Betjiesfontein were the winners of the ATKV 2016 Riel Dance competition in the Junior category and will take to the stage to entertain with their impressive footwork.

This year marks a very special occasion as the ATKV Oesfees reaches its 10th year milestone. Mark Solms from Solms-Delta says: “When we launched the ATKV Oesfees in 2008, we were not sure how it would turn out. But the celebration turned out better than we could have dreamt and the festival just keeps on growing. We proudly share our love for everything that unites us in this beautiful land, with our music and food and wine, and our deepest and best hopes for the years to come.”

“The ATKV’s objectives are to further Afrikaans and provide a cultural home for Afrikaans people. Afrikaans is one of the strongest indigenous languages in Africa, and creates exceptional opportunities for nation building, development and letting the South African landscape thrive. To do this with partners, further enhances the potential for success. Therefore, the cooperation with Solms-Delta is an excellent opportunity for the ATKV to celebrate Afrikaans and turn objectives into achievements, “says Japie Gouws, Managing director of the ATKV group.

Traditional food and excellent wines from the Solms-Delta farm will be on sale. There will be a special area for kids, managed by a professional events company, Cre8tive Kids. Children are registered and are looked after inside a specially fenced, safe area. They can look forward to playful activities all day.

  1. Hope at Paul Cluver Music Festival. 25 March.

Hope @ Paul Cluver Season 4 where, with family and friends, you can still pack a picnic and GATHER TOGETHER for an evening of entertaining concerts at the one of its kind magical, woodlands theatre on Paul Cluver Wine Estate in Elgin. Not to be missed, Hope @ Paul Cluver offers the golden circle Sensational Summer Concerts, by legendary artists.

Your ticket ensures an intimate experience with your favorite artists Elvis Blue 28 January and Watershed 25 February. Die Koningin van die Woude – Karen Zoid, McCully workshop have already graced the stage and wowed their audiences and this Saturday, The Parlotones with their packed out audience will be bursting through the tree tops into the heavens above with the anticipated, enigmatic entertainment.

The artists are ensuring that the profit from this season will top all other seasons by investing their own time in promoting their concert and keeping costs to a minimum. The profit from each ticket sold is going directly to Thembalitsha Foundation’s Village of Hope – a safe haven for children at risk, Educare Grabouw – empowering the community to nurture youngsters through their early years and ThembaCare – the only In Patient Hospice in Grabouw. Thembacare, celebrating their 10th anniversary this year, ensures the community receives home based care and provides HIV, TB and non-communicable disease testing (Diabetes) and Counselling through their mobile testing unit.

Opportunities are being created for up-and-coming South African talent to be showcased alongside established artists in the opening acts including Lee-Ron Malgas and Emma Van Heyn.

For more information, deals and discounts as well as custom-made packages, please contact us on Tel: +27 21 462 6104, info@tripostravel.co.za www.tripostravel.com

The Dubai Mall is a shopping mall in Dubai and the largest mall in the world by total area. Located in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, it is part of the 20-billion-dollar Downtown complex, and includes 1,200 shops. It was the most visited building on the planet, attracting over 54 million visitors per year. Access to the mall is provided via Doha Street, rebuilt as a double-decker road in April 2009.

The Dubai Mall recorded 61,000 tickets sold for the Dubai Aquarium and Discovery Centre in the first five days, following its opening. The Dubai Mall hosted over 37 million visitors in 2009, and attracts more than 750,000 visitors every week. In 2010 it hosted 47 million, and saw footfall increase by around 27 percent over 2009, despite the economic crisis. In 2012, Dubai Mall continued to hold title of world’s most-visited shopping and leisure destination, and attracted more than 65 million visitors, an increase of more than 20 percent compared to the 54 million recorded in 2011. It attracted more visitors than New York City with over 52 million tourists in 2012, and Los Angeles with 41 million. The numbers also surpass visitor arrivals to all landmark leisure destinations and theme parks in the world including Times Square (39.2 million), Central Park (38 million), and Niagara Falls (22.5 million). It is over 13 million square foot (equivalent in size to more than 50 football fields), the Dubai Mall has a total internal floor area of 5.9 million square feet (55 ha) and leasable space of 3.77 million square feet (35 ha), about the same as the West Edmonton Mall.

It also has a 250-room luxury hotel, 22 cinema screens plus 120 restaurants and cafes. The Mall has over 14,000 parking spaces across 3 car parks, with valet services and a car locator ticketing system. The mall has won five awards – two awards at the Retail Future Project Awards at Mapic, Cannes, in 2004, for Best Retail Development Scheme (Large) and Best Use of Lighting in a Retail Environment.

A journey through the Apartheid Museum takes you into the heart of the darkness of evil, and out again into the light. It is an emotional journey designed to encourage visitors to empower themselves with knowledge to prevent such horrors from happening again. The museum gardens offer visitors a space for reflection. The landscape is South African, and conveys the harsh beauty of our country.

The Apartheid Museum opened in 2001 and is acknowledged as the pre-eminent museum in the world dealing with 20th century South Africa, at the heart of which is the apartheid story. In 1995 the South African government set up a process for the granting of casino licenses, establishing an agency to do this called the Gambling Board. The bid documents stipulated that bidders should demonstrate how they would attract tourism and thereby grow the economy and stimulate job creation. A consortium, called Akani Egoli (Gold Reef City), put in a bid that included the commitment to building a museum. Their bid was successful, the Gold Reef City Casino was built and an adjacent piece of land given for the construction of a museum. The cost of the construction of what became the Apartheid Museum – approximately 80 million rand – was paid for by Gold Reef City. The museum is registered as a Section 21 company (incorporated not for gain) with an independent board of trustees, the chairman of which is Dr John Kani. The company is separate from Gold Reef City, which has leased the museum to the Section 21 company for the duration of the casino licence. The museum therefore relies on donations, contributions and sponsorships to sustain its growth.

The Apartheid Museum, the first of its kind, illustrates the rise and fall of apartheid. An architectural consortium, comprising several leading architectural firms, conceptualised the design of the building on a seven-hectare stand. The museum is a superb example of design, space and landscape offering the international community a unique South African experience.

The exhibits have been assembled and organised by a multi-disciplinary team of curators, film-makers, historians and designers. They include provocative film footage, photographs, text panels and artefacts illustrating the events and human stories that are part of the epic saga, known as apartheid. A series of 22 individual exhibition areas takes the visitor through a dramatic emotional journey that tells a story of a state-sanctioned system based on racial discrimination and the struggle of the majority to overthrow this tyranny. For anyone wanting to understand and experience what apartheid South Africa was really like, a visit to the Apartheid Museum is fundamental. The museum is a beacon of hope showing the world how South Africa is coming to terms with its oppressive past and working towards a future that all South Africans can call their own.

World Heritage Site | Robben Island

As you make your way through the corridors of Robben Island, you get transported to a time in South African history where the country reached a turning point. Standing in the jail cell that housed Nelson Mandela for so many years brings to heart the emotional story of the South African struggle for democracy and equality.

A trip to Robben Island is a bittersweet experience but is a must do for anyone visiting Cape Town. Robben Island reinvented itself many times over the years, once a leper colony, a mental hospital and defence training base, this World Heritage Site is most famed as the prison for anti-apartheid activists like our former president, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela.

When you step foot on the Island, you’re able to see the cell in which Mandela, the world’s most famous prisoner, was held for 18 years of his 27-year incarceration. It’s a place many come to be humbled and to pay homage to the father of South African democracy, including the likes of former US president Bill Clinton and current US president Barack Obama.

On “the island”, as it became known, the leaders of the struggle against racial oppression forged their political thinking and the relationships that would become a feature of post-apartheid South Africa. It was also here that Mandela emerged as a leader of the African National Congress. But when Mandela arrived on the island in the winter of 1964, the conditions he encountered were harsh.
Prisoners were confined to small cells with only a sleeping mat and bucket toilet. Each morning they were woken up at 5:30 to empty their buckets and start another day of hard labour. Black prisoners received an inferior diet compared to their white and coloured counterparts. Even more cruelly, they were deprived of contact with their loved ones, limited to a half-hour visit a year from a family member, and only two letters.

The island became an informal “university”, where the prisoners who were to become the next generation of political leaders in South Africa spent many hours in debate and discussion. Isolated from family and friends, Mandela, Walter Sisulu, Govan Mbeki and Ahmed Kathrada, among others, proved themselves to be men of steel, never wavering in their hope of a new South Africa.

It was for this reason that UNESCO’s World Heritage Committee chose to mark this location for its “triumph of the human spirit”. Today, you can catch a ferry ride to what is now called “The Robben Island Museum”. The standard tour starts at the Nelson Mandela Gateway at Cape Town’s V&A Waterfront and takes around 3.5 hours in total (the boat ride is half-an-hour one way). To add to the immersive experience tours are often led by former political prisoners who draw a vivid picture of life in prison. The history of Robben Island is also sketched in a 45-minute bus tour. It’s one of the world’s greatest cultural heritage destinations both for its tragedy and its triumph. It is a testimony to the true spirit of the South African people and history, and will never fail to humble you and give you perspective.

For more information call one of our specialist travel advisers. Let us be your travel consierge. Tel: 021 462 6104 | info@tripostravel.co.za | www.tripostravel.com

Cape Town, 24 January 2017 – espAfrika, the organiser of the country’s longest running and best-loved jazz festival, has pulled out all the stops to ensure that the 18th Cape Town International Jazz Festival exceeds the expectations of its devoted fans. The billing, highlights Festival Director Billy Domingo’s insights into the current musical renaissance around the world, where collaborations are producing unique sounds that are gaining new audiences. The second batch of stars for this year’s CTIJF – which takes place on 31 March & 1 April 2017 – speaks to this movement and adds even more richness and diversity to the event’s reference library of jazz, soul, African and contemporary music.

Jazz fans (purists and those who appreciate crossover crystal clear sounds and piercing notes that thrill) are likely to make a beeline for these exciting acts: Saxophonist, producer and composer Kamasi Washington (USA) and his release The Epic shook up the jazz critics’ pick lists in 2015 and won the 2016 American Music prize, earning new fans across the world in the process; Grammy-nominated songstress Andra Day (USA) whose song Rise Up has been adopted as an anthem for change throughout the world; vocalist, pianist, composer and music educator, and two-time Metro Music Award winner Nomfundo Xaluva (SA); and, the multi-award winning saxophonist, composer and arranger Buddy Wells, who will lead his own band in a sensitive yet blistering set as the Buddy Wells Sextet (SA).

Those who favour urban sounds and hip hop will find appeal in these artists who offer everything from the fresh, dreamy inspiration of a British producer in his early 20s to the harder-edged, funky flavours of a trio of respected (and long-missed) Brooklyn veterans: Alternative hip hop trio Digable Planets (USA); dance/electronic music producer Jameszoo (NL); STTA (SA) – a live concept band and City Festival Battle of the Bands 2016 winner, comprising of drummer Jstar, turntablists DJ Raiko and DJ P–Kuttah, three live beat machine samplers, versatile vocalist/ Nasty J aka Joniq; and singer/composer, multi-instrumentalist and producer Tom Misch (UK), who leaves his London bedroom studio to head to Cape Town for the first time in March.

Those seeking the ancestral roots of jazz and hip hop in African music will be captivated by these artists, offering music from the deserts of Mali, Morocco and the Kalahari: Jokko is a supergroup of African instrumentalists that brings together five top-ranking players of traditional instruments, all fluent in the modern languages of pop, dance and jazz. Renowned balafon (wooden xylophone) player Aly Keita, stringed instrument (guembri and ghayta) player Mehdi Nassouli, Foulane Bouhssine “the Mozart of the ribab”, bassist Childo Thomas and, Senegalese drummer Sega Seck.

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Also announced in the second half of the CTIJF 2017 line-up, are some of our country’s greatest talents, from big local names to rising stars: South Africa’s ‘unofficial minister of music’ whose social commentary takes root in preserving the heritage of indigenous music, the legendary composer, multi-instrumentalist and producer “Pops” Mohamed (SA) will be gracing the CTIJF stage. Festinos will be transported to the past and future with this unusual artist’s blend of sounds, taking influence from decades of traditional and modern music; Another South African great, the multiple award-winning and platinum-selling group Mango Groove (SA) whose unique ‘Maribi-Pop’ sound has been delighting world audiences since the 80’s; Khayelitsha-based Arts & Culture Focus School Chris Hani High School (SA) will bring the talents of young past and present students to the CTIJF stage, including students from the CTIJF’s Training & Development programme, with a mix of jazz and African influences; this year’s special performance by Camillo Lombard presents a Cape Town Showcase (SA) will profile consummate Cape Town legends who have made their mark in the music industry for over four decades. The line-up will include Sophia Foster, Terry Fortune, Sylvia Mdunyelwa, Sammy Webber and Songstress Vicky Sampson. The Cape Town Showcase also boasts a stellar 14-piece band that comprises a six-piece rhythm section, five horns and three backing vocals.

Festinos will be delighted by performances from multiple award-winner vocalist and songwriter Thandiswa Mazwai (SA); SAMA-winning, Congolese-born, Cape Town-based vocalist/composer Tresor (SA); and Sonik Citizen (SA) one of the many musical identities of multi-talented performer, composer and teacher, and multiple award winner Mark Fransman, who will showcase his “lyrical-soul-rock” style at the CTIJF.

“The CTIJF has reached a point where it is known to deliver a good product. This was evidenced by the sale of tickets even before we made the first artist announcement this year,” commented Billy Domingo. Thanking loyal fans for their support, Domingo went on to say that festival-goers’ faith has been justified in what he dubs as “one of the most potent socially conscious musical line-ups ever staged in South Africa, and one that has exceptional cachet.” It is clearly not to be missed.

Executive Mayor of Cape Town, Alderman Patricia de Lille concurs, “Our City can boast of many jazz icons who have united us around our common love for music and the unique sounds of Cape Town jazz. Those sounds are deeply woven into both our past and our present, and they continue to bring us together. The CTIJF is not just a local favourite, but has rightfully taken its place as one of the primary festivals of its kind on a global scale. Every year it gives us the opportunity to consolidate our position as the events capital of Africa, and brings a national and international audience to our world-class local acts.”

The Minister of Arts and Culture, Mr Nathi Mthethwa, pointed out that: “The Cape Town International Jazz Festival, now in its 18th edition, continues to attract the best musicians from South Africa and abroad; and the musical collaborations that result from this rich engagement produce music that captures the cultural imagination of our people, builds continental cohesion and speaks to the world at large.”

Previously announced artists include:

Jazz supergroup Jazz Funk Soul with Everette Harp, Jeff Lorber & Paul Jackson Jr (USA); Ernie Smith (SA), VuDu (SA); Rudresh Mahanthappa Bird Calls (USA); Gretchen Parlato (USA); Siya Makuzeni (SA); Skyjack (SA/ SWISS); Tune Recreation Committee (SA); Darren English (SA/ USA), Jonas Gwangwa & Friends (SA).
Taylor McFerrin and Marcus Gilmore (USA); Dope Saint Jude (SA); Laura Mvula (UK); Judith Sephuma (SA); The Rudimentals (SA); Sekunjalo Edujazz Band (SA); Manu Dibango (Cameroon) and Moreira Chonguica (Mozambique); Deepak Pandit (India); Marcus Wyatt (SA) and Ranjit Barot (India); Escalandrum (Argentina); and Soweto String Quartet (SA) .
The official sponsors for the 18th annual Cape Town International Jazz Festival 2017 amongst other are as follows: The Department of Arts and Culture, Independent Media, and host city The City of Cape Town, Johnnie Walker, Amstel and more.

Tickets are available at www.computicket.com at the following links:
Weekend Passes: http://bit.ly/2eHG6bJ
Day Passes: http://bit.ly/2fuzXOO

For corporate hospitality packages, contact Samantha on 021 671 0506 or email hospitality@espafrika.com

Follow CTIJF on social media and use the official hashtag to share your CTIJF experience with us:

Official hashtag: #CTIJF2017
Facebook: facebook.com/CTJazzFest
Twitter: twitter.com/CTJazzFest
Instagram: Instagram.com/capetownjazzfest

Follow espAfrika for exclusive news, competitions and updates:
Facebook: facebook.com/espafrika
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For further information and media enquiries, please contact:

Nomsa Mdhuli: Nomsa@networxpr.co.za
Or
Kaz Henderson: kaz@networxpr.co.za

About Cape Town International Jazz Festival
The Cape Town International Jazz Festival (CTIJF) is the flagship event for the leading events management and production company espAfrika, which has staged and produced several world-renowned events.
Affectionately referred to as “Africa’s Grandest Gathering”, the Cape Town International Jazz Festival is the largest music event in sub-Saharan Africa. The Cape Town International Jazz Festival (CTIJF), now preparing for its 17th year, is an annual event. It is famous for delivering a star-studded line up featuring international and local artists in the jazz and jazz-related genres. This proudly South African event is hosted at the Cape Town International Convention Centre (CTICC) each year on the last weekend of March or the first weekend of April.
The festival boasts multiple stages with over forty artists performing over two nights. The festival hosts an excess of 37, 000 music lovers over the two show days and is combined with the CTIJF Sustainable Training & Development programme that aims to uplift and educate the youth. http://www.capetownjazzfest.com/

About espAfrika
espAfrika is a global leader in creating and producing unique entertaining experiences. With nearly twenty years in the industry, the company has grown into one of the most highly-awarded event management and production organisations in South Africa. espAfrika thrives on realising clients’ ideas and creating exceptional concepts that are relevant and engaging to today’s audiences. espAfrika owns and manages annual events such as the Cape Town International Jazz Festival which attracts festinos from around the world. espAfrika is a proud subsidiary of African Equity Empowerment Investments (AEEI)
www.espafrika.com